Studio Visit: Amy Todman

Text and images by Varduhi Kirakosian


Even locals swearing to know every single street in the city might struggle to spot addresses in Yerevan’s confusing and congested neighborhoods. But this doesn’t seem to be the case for Amy Todman, a Scottish born artist living in Yerevan for the past two years, who, I believe, finds her way around the city better than most. 

This is my second visit to Amy’s apartment on Komitas Avenue, Arabkir district. I challenge myself to find her flat, refusing her offer to remind me of the way. Luckily, I recognize the familiar entrance where I notice wool, washed and hung to dry for sewing linen – a popular household tradition among Armenian women. 

Amy is at the door. She greets me warmly just as locals are used to kissing on the cheek when they meet. As we walk into a quiet wide room filled with small and big canvases piled up in the corners, I ask Amy whether she gets along well with her neighbors. Amy describes the nice little garden she sometimes visits and notes, “I don’t know what people think, but I’m pretty quiet and usually, I stay by myself”. That quality gives her the chance to spend time on her own and feel free to create and experiment. Amy has been trying hard to learn Armenian since she moved here from Scotland. She finds Armenian very challenging and the language barrier is limiting and makes communicating with her neighbors practically impossible. “Until I learn well, and am confident to speak Armenian, really I can make friends with only those who speak English,” Amy explains. 

“I’ve always made art,” Amy notes. She graduated with a Bachelors in Fine Arts from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design in 2003. Her first artworks were with textiles, which she exhibited through a number of installations. She was inspired by the process of making work that involved tactile materials like thread. In her early career she also worked in Arts education, working with a range of learners to explore what art might mean to them. For the next four years she lived in Leeds, England, and Glasgow, Scotland, where she worked on a range of public art and education projects. Amy kept the impulse to create and experiment with different media throughout the years, though she acknowledges that making art has always had a special impact on her, “driving [her] crazy in a way.”  That’s when she convinced herself to “start being a grown up,” as she puts it.

Amy’s “grown up” years brought her to various art institutions as both an educator and researcher. At the Pier Arts Centre in Orkney she looked at the connections among landscape, museums and contemporary art collections. Her passion for nature deepened when exploring plant collections at the Glasgow Botanic Gardens, which formed the foundation for her Ph.D. in the idea of landscape in 16th and 17th century Britain. Amy spent several years working at the National Library of Scotland as both a curator and archivist, where she dove into their department of Manuscripts and Archives and worked with their Political Collections.

“But then I suddenly left everything. And here I am,” Amy laughs.

Right after welcoming me, she gets back to her work, sitting on the floor in the middle of her studio. I can see the full picture now: Amy seated cross-legged surrounded by her artworks, flanked by her recent sculptures and the one in progress. Amy presents me her works, excitedly showing me “The Brain.” “The Brain’’ is her recent sculpture, made of old newspapers, chicken wire, and flour and water paste (Papier-mâché). It’s quite big, maybe the size of forty human brains, and is symbolic of Amy’s journey.  “The Brain” is the materialization of that side of Amy that is more analytical, methodical, organized and makes more logical conclusions. 

“I moved to Armenia two years ago because I wanted to refocus, just make art. I wanted to feel more alive,” Amy continues thoughtfully. In 2018, with a developing creative practice, and a desire to engage with new cultures and communities, Amy wanted to work on her art, writing and archival practice in a new environment. 

“I had reached a successful point in my professional career. I loved my job, but at some point, I felt unable to continue. Even though I always realized that making art has driven me to craziness, I realized at some point, that it is also the thing that makes me want to be alive. Once I understood that, the rest was easy.”

The idea of sculpting her own brain came from a need to separate herself from her brain. “I made ‘The Brain’ to be sure it’s out there, to be watchful of it and to remind myself to let go and be a bit more relaxed,” she reflects. In contrast to “The Brain”, looking at Amy’s artworks one notices repeating patterns, forms, shapes, and colors that resemble or remind us of oranges. Oranges appear in Amy’s embroideries and on canvases. For Amy, her oranges seem to symbolize a kind of chaotic energy in opposition to her analytical self. One could say the orange motif (life full of energy, vibrance and colors) represents Amy’s choice to leave everything and start a journey to the unknown. More recently this idea has developed into a sculptural intestinal form, physically wrapping the brain and perhaps symbolizing a kind of conflict or coming together. I don’t think she’s quite sure yet what it means. 

Amy’s journey also appears in her work in the form of  a long horizontal line that stretches from one side of the canvas to the other. I spot the identical line on the wall of her studio, as well as in a tattoo running the length of her arm. Amy has more journeying to do in Armenia. “I don’t have a plan to leave Armenia. My work flows here.” She also has some ideas for collaborating with the local artists. “There is something about Armenia that gives me room for exploring things and experimenting. It inspires me to make whatever kind of art I want without too much judgment, or criticism. I feel less pressure here in Armenia and I feel that Armenia drives me forward in my artistic journey.”

Amy has been profoundly influenced by images, colors, patterns, structures and systems of nature around her.

“Sometimes I feel at home in Armenia because there are similarities to the Scottish landscape. There is wonderful color in the Armenian landscape, shades of ochre, yellow, something flat, desert, but not desert, it’s something else. The color is very unique. When you come into Britain by plane and look from above, you see and understand the way that the landscape is arranged. The landscape is, among other things, an organized area. If we understand the idea of landscape as a kind of tension between chaos and order, natural and man-made, for example, then we see it reflected in our psyche, through the landscape and places we are surrounded by. The landscape feels less regulated in Armenia, and that is interesting for me, different to what I am used to. Armenia has its own way of being ordered and arranged, but it is not clear to me exactly what that is, whereas in Britain I understand the order more.” 

Amy thinks there is more flexibility in the Armenian landscape. “I just walk around the city, look and feel. Because there are a lot of abandoned factories in Yerevan, when I walk, I have the same feeling as in Glasgow, which also has an industrial past. There, lots of old factories are repurposed as studios or similar places, and it is relatively easy for people to go in and do something: these areas seem to fit for doing some crazy stuff. I’m not entirely sure what I can or can’t do here, but I feel that these things are happening here too.” 

Not only the nature, but even the basic distinct features of the neighborhood, be it the surrounding yard, a half destroyed building, or just the solar panels of a building outside her window, appear unconsciously or knowingly in the artists’ works whether through the colors that repeat or the forms and shapes. Amy’s work is meditative and ephemeral. She explains in her artist statement that ‘using drawing, found objects and words, my work explores the delicate territories of self and other, what’s around the edge, and what lies at the heart of the matter”. She “plays between imposed external control and trust in a process”. As curator, Anna Gargarian notes, 

“[Amy’s] process is intuitive, yet disciplined. She is less concerned with the outcome (she calls her pieces “relics”) and more interested in what brings them to life. The tension we find in her work reflects a personal tension, as she oscillates between her identities as artist and archivist, intuitive maker and structure-loving analyst”. 

Amy describes herself as someone very organized and detail oriented. She loves order and routine, which are at the core of her everyday life as an artist. “There are two sides of Amy,” she tells me; “Completely creative Amy, unpredictable, and there is very orderly Amy, and her very structured work. Amy can’t be both at the same time.”

Amy takes me to another room, small in comparison to her main work space. The walls are colored bright green and there is a large window that lets in enough light to make it another perfect studio space. “Some of my works I made here.” On the small work table, I can see Amy’s collection of map drawings. While I closely observe the works, trying to grasp the details, Amy describes the significance of the process of working and archiving within her artistic practice. Her progress partly relies on a practical and ritualistic approach.

It is interesting to see how Amy makes sense of her own journey as an archivist, art historian and artist. She reflects upon the influence that each of her professions have had on her art making. As a student of art collecting and the art market, she has learned to value artworks but at the same time look beyond what is art and what is not. “What defines art?” is a question that she explored during her studies. As an archivist, Amy believes she learned to take care of each thing she makes, however insignificant something might look, and put things in order, make sense of everything as she records her daily work. Art history, she thinks, helped her to develop an analytical and critical eye on her work. She observes her works in great detail and writes about them, creating a kind of conversation between her, the art work and the written description.

When asked about her future projects, Amy notes that things will change after her exhibition in Armenia. “The exhibition that we are planning for this fall is going to be an end point and a starting point at the same time. It will be the beginning of something new.” Amy has some projects in mind which she might be developing at the IN SITU project space. She is also interested in artist residencies in general. She believes that an artist residency offers a whole new environment where different artists combine and share a whole new energy flowing through them. 

“I feel comfortable working here in my studio, I can’t say that I am attached to places, because I like moving a lot. It helps me to disturb the routine sometimes. For someone who likes following a routine, changes are needed to introduce novelty.” Though Amy likes change, she also longs for constancy and permanency, since being far away from home, the only way to develop a sense of home is to have a space where she can find herself belonging to. 

***

From September 8 to 17, join us at Dalan Art Gallery for a solo exhibit of works by artist Amy Todman that take us on a journey “From here to there” across her daily artistic practice. Amy will be at the venue daily from 16:00 – 18:00.

Dalan Art Gallery
Open Daily from 11:00 – 23:00
Abovyan 12, Second Floor

2017: A YEAR OF HAYP

By Dalita Khoury and the HAYP team

HAYP’s third year has come to an end, and we have to say, it’s been our most ambitious and exciting year yet. With our largest exhibition in history and our first international exhibit ever, people are really catching on to the HAYP. Before we close the chapter on 2017, we thought we would reminisce about our greatest moments.

Continue reading

Vardavar 2016 – HAYP concepts

Last Sunday, July 3rd, people flooded (pun intended) the streets of Yerevan with buckets, water-guns, water balloons, and other water artilleryin-hand, ready to splash passersby for Vardavar. Vardavar is an Armenian holiday that stems from pagan origins, originally celebrating fertility, good crops, and the goddess Astghik. Today, its just an excuse to shower strangers with water and playfully cool off from Armenias powerful heat. It gets intense, and theres definitely a lot of unfair play that borders on being dangerous, like people getting thrown into the not-so-deep swan lake (sounds like fun – until you break a limb). You either love it or hate it, and for the hatersits recommended to stay indoors.

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For the first time, Armenias beloved TUMO Center for Creative Technologies organized a Vardavar event on its surrounding grounds. TUMOs park and fountains were transformed into a one-day water park for kids and adults alike to celebrate Vardavar with a creative edge. The event theme: a Vardavar GIF day. TUMO invited several companies and organizations to design and set-up their individual game-stands that would engage participants. Each stand was also handed a waterproof iPad so that they could document the action with a GIF. Impact Hub had a large water slide, DEEM communications had an old-school car wash etc.

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View of the TUMO grounds on Vartavar. Photo credits: Gevorg Perkuperyan Photography

HAYP was also invited to participate, and we contacted artist and architect Sona Manukyan to collaborate on a potential water-themed installation piece. We designed several proposals, but in the end, time and funding were too short to carry out the project as we saw fit. Regardless, we spent a lot of time putting together some ideas, and we thought wed share with you our renders and concepts. The area we selected was the TUMO cement bus stop at the park entrance. Here are the ideas we came up with.

IDEA 1: The cloud

Render of the bus stop with a hovering cloud installation:

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This installation had several sources of inspiration. While thinking of water and its cleansing properties, we thought of a work that would send a powerful and positive message concerning the environment. We thought of the transformative properties of water, and also the dire state of pollution in Armenia. The result: a hovering white form within the bus stop frame that from afar would look like a cloud, and from up close, would reveal hundreds of suspended individual objects. On one side, we envisioned droplet-like shapes that would hang from transparent fishing-line string. The materials of these shapes would be white plastic bags, metallic cans, and other white, translucent and/or reflective reusable materials. On the other side, a series of suspended crystals would capture the surrounding light and give the illusion of rainfall or water droplets.

Our renders:

 

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This render shows a matrix of barely-visible fishing line on which each item is fastened.

Conceptually, the cloud shows a transformation of trashinto crystals, in other words the potential for positive change as well as a subtle reference to the economic potential of a green economy. From an experiential perspective, some of the hanging items would be white water balloons, and we hoped that people would play beneath the cloud and pop some balloons.

Some examples of inspiring crystal installations:

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IDEA 2: The Blue Maze

This installation idea utilizes the same location, but features a series of zig-zagging twisted blue sheets of cloth that would connect one side of the bus stop to the other. From a distance, the colorful labyrinth of blue, turquoise, and white cloth intertwined intends to give the illusion of a splashing waterfall or misty haze.

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From an experiential perspective, the maze was intended to be a game in which kids could climb through and over the cloth. The type of material that we were going to select would have been spongy and absorbent, so that as the structure would get wet from the surrounding fun and games, the  sculpture itself would begin to drip as an extra effect.

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In the end, our collaboration was postponed for technical reasons that were mentioned earlier. HAYP is all about having fun, but also while maintaining our mission for supporting and encouraging contemporary art and artists. We simply felt that with the amount of time we had to plan and build, we wouldnt be able to uphold our standard for quality product and work. Regardless, TUMO Vardavar was a successful day of fun and games for kids and families who enjoyed a new twist off of a long-standing local tradition.

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Fun in the park at TUMO. Photo credits: Tumo.org

Summer ‘16 with HAYP Pop Up Gallery

Happy summer everyone! Wondering what’s in the works for HAYP these next few months? Here’s a little insight into our upcoming plans.

What’s the news with FLOW?

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First off, you may have heard of or been wondering about our plans for FLOW, a summer festival for which we have been contacting artists, potential partners and funders for the past year. The project is large-scale and involves several international visual artists, and many international musical performers. The public interest and appeal is there, but the challenges lie in other expected (and unexpected) areas. A primary concern for us is everyone’s safety, especially considering the location’s proximity to the NK border. Due to recent political unrest at the borders, both the HAYP team and some of our sponsors have decided that August 2016 is not an optimal moment. For now the project is temporarily on hold. This news is both disappointing and also a blessing in disguise, as we think more time will give us the opportunity for better results. 

That said, we have other exciting projects in stock. Here’s the line-up:

June 23: A Pop-Up Performance

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Coming soon is an Aerial Dance Performance by Armenian-Argentinian dancer Marcela Perez. You may remember seeing Marcela perform at HAYP back in April 2015 at ANKAPital. Marcela is back from Buenos Aires and HAYP seized the opportunity to collaborate once again. What’s new this time around? We are adding some major height to her act. Marcela will be suspended from above for her aerial choreography, but this time we get to experience her whimsical movements on the rooftop lounge at Opera Suite Hotel.

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The bar is called Forty-Four Sky, and cocktails, food, and hookah are available alongside a spectacular view of Yerevan. Don’t miss out on this one-time special event. There will be a showing on Thursday, June 23rd at 8:30pm and 9:30pm. DJ set to follow.

June 25: HAYP Workshop for HARTAK FESTIVAL

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The second event happening in June is a Pop Up Workshop organized in the framework of the Hartak Festival organized by AEON anti-café. The workshop goal is to guide participants on how to make their ideas happen. This 3-hour workshop will involve a short presentation by HAYP, and especially hands-on work by workshop members. We’ll go over how to thoroughly develop a concept through market research and public feedback, how to seek out partnerships, locations, sponsors and more. We will share our experience and know-how on how to transform an idea into a reality. Join us with an idea, enthusiasm, and ready-to-work energy! More info and sign up available on the Hartak Festival website here. We are waiting for you!

July 3: HAYP for TUMO on VARDAVAR

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HAYP Pop Up Gallery is going to join the Tumo team to celebrate Vardavar 2016, happening this year on July 3rd. HAYP will be among the various collaborators invited to participate at a day full of events, installations and fun in the major park surrounding TUMO center. We will curate a unique art installation inspired by this pagan water festival. More info coming soon, so stay tuned!

 

 

Call to artists: In Motion 2015

GeneralIn Motion

HAYP pop-up gallery is seeking artists to be a part of a traveling installation on October 29, 2015. The site of installation will be the interior of a South Caucasus Railway passenger car. The train will depart from Yerevan Station at 8am and arrive in Gyumri at noon. We seek artists of both visual and performing arts. The artist(s) must assist with the installation and disassembling of the work(s). The length of the installation will be announced in the near future but could range from seven to ten days.train cart

We will allow visual artists to propose a variety of mediums for this project; performers may also explain their concepts. Both must keep in mind the physical and timely constraints of the train.

The theme

“In Motion” plays with the transitional state of our context: the train. A train is always between places, and the installation itself should reflect th12088548_10104357110372689_1930018338040515723_ne transient state of time and place. We encourage artists to propose installations that are interactive, and show the passage of time through people’s engagement with the art. Maybe they can leave something behind or take something with them…? We are open to your ideas!

Submissions

Photos

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A happy look-back on HAYP3.0

Our third art exhibit “The Scale of Life” finished last week, on September 7. 

After having installed and removed dozens of spotlights, hanged and unhooked the artworks, and organized 5 events over 10 days of exhibition, you might think this should now be holiday time for us… but it isn’t – the HAYP Team is on the move again!

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Taking down the exhibit. Credits: HAYP

Last week, after (well-deserved) celebration following the end of the exhibit, we were already on the lookout for new locations, and actively planning our next exhibition.

But before we go on and announce our upcoming project, let us first give credit where credit is due: none of our HAYP shenanigans would be possible without the help and support of so many people around us.

Thank you!

From the very beginnings of HAYP, we were lucky enough to collaborate with like-minded people who helped us pop up around Yerevan. For this exhibition in particular, we teamed up with DZOOK Pop Up Restaurant on our opening night – they provided a delicious culinary experience for our guests through a special fish tasting that was in perfect accordance with our exhibition theme inspired by water and its mythical creatures. The degustation was paired with a variety of delicious white wines, courtesy of Karas wines.

It was also amazing to work with Yerevan Residence. Irina and Nvart from reception were always helpful and smiling, occasionally even providing coffee during much needed work hours! Obviously, transforming empty penthouses into trendy art galleries is what we do, but the EL media team also took wonderful photos of our opening night, and will feature us in their bilingual “El Style” magazine this month. Exciting!

For the third time in a row, The ScREenery generously lent us their projector and hosted a film event in our space. The Luys Foundation team was kind enough to lend us dozens of chairs for the whole duration of the exhibit.

Thank you also to Green Bean, Artbridge, and Calumet for helping us sell and distribute tickets to opening night.

Artists, performers

Seven artists re-interepreted the vishap with different approaches and media – Melissa Finkenbiner, LUSKA, Félix Romanos, Moushegh Mkhitaryan, Avetik Vardanyan, Hrachya Vardanyan, and Alice Dunseath. Thank you also to ARLOOPA for generously sponsoring their programming work that added tech to LUSKA’s amazing mural. This was a definite hit at opening night, along with the electronic music performance by Joseph Zakarian, our special DJ from Amman who generously contributed to our project.

During our event week, the performers each brought a new crowd to the gallery, and helped interpret the exhibition from different perspectives – an archeology talk, an avant-garde theater performance, contemporary dance, and sound installation…

On Wednesday, Armen Martirosian gave a concise talk about pagan Armenia during the Urartean period, before engaging in a conversation with the public. He showed us the amazing artifacts he and the archeological team have been discovering at the site of Karmir Blur… and probably stirred up a few archeological vocations right then and there.

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Armen Martirosian’s talk. Photo credits: HAYP

On Friday, Aram Atamian presented “in her plenty”, a solo theater performance that left many spectators with their jaws floored… among other limbs, because with nearly 100 people attending, we couldn’t secure seats for everyone.

We were so awed by Aram’s poignant, witty performance that we decided to run it again the next night. This time around the vibe amongst our smaller group was more intimate, leading to a spontaneous talk-back with the performer who explained how he came up with the idea of mixing Shakespeare, gay chat-roulette and Beyoncé in one piece. 

Caution: below video has adult content.

We hosted a very special performance on Monday for our closing night. On the rooftop of the gallery, BA-AR-DIA Dance Studio (and therapy) performed a contemporary piece choreographed by Hasmik Tangyan, with a sound installation by LSD. The result was an eerie, beautiful show, with Mount Ararat and Yerevan sunset-lit roofs as a background.

We were happy to get media coverage for this event. CivilNet.am filmed the whole performance and interviewed our curator Anna K. Gargarian, along with the choreographer, Hasmik Tangyan, and the head of ICA Yerevan Nazareth Karoyan.

Our core support network – volunteers, friends, family

As we set up the exhibition and organized the events, we relied heavily on an extended network of dedicated volunteers… and our loved ones who gently got drafted for HAYP.

The amazing Liana Dashyan and Lusine Vardanyan translated our exhibition materials (wall text, wall labels, press release and social media) from English to Armenian. Anna Hakobyan, Mary Hakobyan and Nairi Khatchadourian also helped with occasional translation issues- thanks!

Our friend Lilit Markosian (one of the first HAYP artists, from the exhibtion “Frame of Mind”) created beautiful graphics for our event PR.

For photography, a warm thank you to our dear friend Karine Vann for her work on opening night. Also thanks to volunteer students Helena Grigoryan, Isaac Bulanikian, Alexandra Bejanyan, and Gugo Tadevosyan from Chantal Terzian’s art class for their assistance.

My sister Sévane Poulain filmed all of our events with her camera, and prepared a video montage of the whole exhibition. Also for filming, thank you to Areg Kozmoyan, Lucine Bekaryan and Peter Liakhov for recording Aram Atamian’s performance.

Several other friends like Garni & Arbi helped out in many ways, big or small. Carrying artworks, chairs, tables, lending electric teapots, buying us coffee, putting up the HAYP signs along the road to Yerevan Residence. For all this, thank you janiks!

Last but not least, we’d like to extend a warm-felt “thank you” to our network of fans: those who never miss an exhibition, who invite their own friends and family to join, share our projects on social media and give us great feedback.

We are also very happy that so many of you noticed the latest art addition to our gallery. It’s a contemporary art installation highlighting the neo-liberal and ecological tragedy of our times: oceans being emptied of their magical creatures (water dragons, vishaps and other goldfish) to be filled, instead, with money. Seriously, thanks for giving some love to our new homemade donation fishbowl – we greatly appreciate!

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Our donation fishbowl (it was full at one point!) | Credits: HAYP

Sad to say goodbye to this exhibition? You don’t have to! We’ll pop up again soon, and in the meantime, you can get a limited edition print of Luska’s mural, signed by the artist, to bring augmented reality to your home! Available in medium/large size at respectively USD 50 and USD 150. Contact us at info.hayp@gmail.com!

Anna K. Gargarian, our curator, holding a print of Luska's work. This photo was taken with the ARLOOPA app! Photo credits: HAYP

Anna K. Gargarian, our curator, holding a print of Luska’s work. This photo was taken with the ARLOOPA app! Photo credits: HAYP

Charlotte Poulain & Anna K. Gargarian

FLOW – Lake Sevan 2016

By Anna K. Gargarian


 

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Some of you may have been hearing the buzz about FLOW, HAYP’s summer project by lake Sevan. Although it was originally planned for 2015, the project will take place next summer of 2016. Why? We’ve received so many interesting proposals for collaboration by artists and musicians alike that the project has grown from a one-day event to a three-day festival. Instead of rushing things and doing a watered-down version of the project, we decided to dedicate the proper amount of time to plan and budget the FLOW we really want to see take place. What, you may ask, is this FLOW we envision?

The Project

FLOW is a three day cultural festival that includes: a temporary site-specific installation, three days of performance (dance, theater and experimental shows), and two evenings of concerts featuring local and international musicians. The unique location, Port Ayas, is a coastal campsite on Lake Sevan near Shorja village. It offers a stunning landscape for artists to work with, and an amazing experience for guests to explore art, grab a bite, take a swim, and even spend the night camping. What’s more, docked at Port Ayas is Cilicia, the legendary wooden sailboat that traveled across Europe (it took two years), and that is modeled after the historic 13th century merchant ship from the Cilicia Kingdom. The vessel measures 20m long, weighs 50 tons, and was entirely constructed from shipbuilding techniques found in medieval manuscripts.

Charlotte and I visiting the sailboat two months ago. It's currently under renovation, but still amazing and full of character.

Charlotte and I visiting the sailboat two months ago. It’s currently under renovation, but still amazing and full of character.

Exhibition Concept

The theme, FLOW, is inspired by water: it’s movement, sound, and symbolism. Water has long-been a source of creative inspiration. We invite artists to explore this theme through various media: painting, photography, installation, sculpture, video, sound…. whatever floats your boat (pun intended).

Here are some examples of works we like from around the world that have served as inspiration for this project:

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Land -art installation by Gerry Berry in Ireland.

Water Installations

Left: Inflatable light installation by Spacecadets (Great Britain). Right: “Walk on water” pod-men by Bits’n’pieces (Boston).

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“Please Touch the Art” Mirror installation by Jeppe Hein at the Brooklyn Bridge park. Photo credits: Dezeen.com.

We’ve been working hard these past two months securing the location and figuring out logistics. We’ve brainstormed with beloved local band (gone international) BAMBIR, as well as emerging musical and visual artist Raffi Semerdjian and his band Palm of Granite.

Bambir_2007albumWe’ve been Skyping with internationally renowned Armenian artist, Kevork Mourad (Syrian-born, New York-based painter, film-maker, and performer), and sketching and engineering large-scale sculptural works with local artists and chemists (yes, that’s right…chemists…you wait and see!).

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Artist Kevork Mourad at work in his studio in New York.

If you’re interested in getting involved, don’t hesitate to contact us. We will put up a call to projects this month with more information on how to be a part of FLOW- LAKE SEVAN 2016.

In the mean time…

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Pop-Up restaurant by Muvbox in Montreal, Canada.

Stay tuned for what’s happening this month with HAYP! We’re combining forces with a new local Pop-up Restaurant lead by Victoria Aleksanyan and Arine Aghazarian to bring food and art together for a full experience of the senses. More information coming next week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

HAYP 2.0: Call To Artists!

ANKAPital_call_to_artistsներքո տրված է Հայերեն լեզվով

CALL TO ARTISTS!

HAYP Pop Up Gallery presents,

“ANKAPital” a Collective Exhibit

April 2015, Yerevan AM

Application deadline: March 30, 2015

Send to: info.hayp@gmail.com

Here it is guys, our “Call to artists” for HAYP Pop Up Gallery’s next exhibition, “ANKAPital” on view in Yerevan in April, 2015. Specific dates and location still to-be-determined, so stay tuned!

 Below you’ll find the exhibition concept in both English and Armenian for your convenience, but here’s a quick summary of the exhibition theme.

ANKAPital in a nutshell:

For HAYP Pop Up Gallery’s second project, we will be featuring a collective exhibition in mixed media with an urban feel and a focus on graphic arts: Street Art, Illustration, Video/Projection, installation and Painting will be the principal media. ANKAPital asks artists to pay attention to the “awkwardness” of their surroundings. What about your contemporary culture seems ironic, contradictory, or even out of place to you? All of the exhibiting artists share a highly contemporary, young, and bold voice. The selected works will be statement pieces: political, provocative, erotic, and/or simply funny- this is not a passive exhibit. This is a declaration of vitality that embraces the adventurous. The works are here, now, and they call for your attention! The urban style of the exhibit, in both the selection and the display of the works, intends to highlight the dynamic, creative, and innovative buzz that is typical of large metropolis and that is the backdrop for united disunity!

 


 Կոչ արվեստագետներին՝

«ANKAPital» համատեղ ցուցահանդես

Անցկացման ժամանակահատվածը` 2015 թ. ապրիլ

Վայրը` կհայտարարենքԱրվեստագետի դիմում՝ մինչև մարտի 30,2015

Ուղարկե՛ք բոլոր դիմումները info.hayp@gmail.com

 

Ձեզ համար: մեր “Կոչ արվեստագետներին՝” ՀԱԻՓ-ի հաջորդ ցուցահանդեսի անվանումն է “ԱՆԿԱՊիտալ”, կ՛ներկայացվի 2015 Ապրիլին. Վայրը` և օրը կհայտարարենք, խնդրում ենք հետևել.

Ձեր հարմարության համար, ներքո տրված է տեղեկություն ցուցահանդեսի մասին Անգլերեն և Հայերեն լեզուներով: Տրված է նաեվ ցուցահանդեսի համառոտ թեմատիկան:

 

ANKAPital համառոտ թեմատիկան

«HAYP» ժամանակակից արվեստի շրջիկ պատկերասրահի երկրորդ նախագծի շրջանակում մենք պատրաստվում ենք ներկայացնել տարբեր մեդիաների կիրառմամբ համատեղ ցուցահանդես` ուրբանիստական ոճով ու գրաֆիկական արվեստի շեշտադրումով: Ներկայացված հիմնական մեդիաներից կլինեն սթրիթ արթը (փողոցային արվեստ), պատկերազարդումը, վիդեո-ցուցադրությունը և նկարչությունը: Կազմակերպվող այս նոր ցուցահանդեսի ընթացքում «HAYP»ը խնդրում է արվեստագետներին ուշադրություն դարձնել իրենց շրջակա միջավայրի «անշուքությանը»: Իսկ ի՞նչ կլինի, եթե ժամանակակից մշակույթը ձեզ հեգնական, հակասական և անգամ անհարկի թվա:

Ցուցահանդեսին մասնակցող բոլոր արվեստագետները շատ ժամանակակից, երիտասարդ ու համարձակ ձեռագիր ունեն: Ընտրված աշխատանքները յուրատեսակ հայտարարություններ են լինելու` քաղաքական, սադրիչ, էրոտիկ և/կամ պարզապէս ծիծաղաշարժ. սա պասիվ ցուցահանդես չէ: Սա կենսունակության կոչ է, որը գրավում է արկածախնդիրներին: Աշխատանքները հիմա այստեղ են ու Ձեր ուշադրությունն են հայցում:

Ներկայացվող աշխատանքների ընտրության և ցուցադրության հարցում ուղենիշ հանդիսացած ուրբանիստական ոճը նպատակ ունի ընդգծելու մեծ քաղաքներին բնորոշ դինամիկ, ստեղծագործական ու նորարարական իրարանցումը` միասնական պառակտման այս ֆոնին:


DOWNLOADS:

English:  ANKAPital_Call_to_artists_eng

Հայերեն: ANKAPital_կոչ_արվեստագետներին_հայերեն