NOR DADA: Performance & Disruption

by Anna K. Gargarian


As a neo-dadaist project, including a performative element was essential to the concept development of NOR DADA. Recalling the notorious performances of the Cabaret Voltaire, dadaism’s mission to disrupt spread further than the visual boundaries of the page or the readymade object, and into the personal space of the body through public actions and provocative performance. Dada experimented with sound and movement in order to engage (and sometimes assault) its audience in a directly physical way, and challenge the metaphoric and literal line of the stage separating reality from fiction.

Continue reading

Opening “NOR-DADA” in Venice

by Charlotte Poulain


Prepping

A short three months ago HAYP Pop Up Gallery was contacted by the GAA Foundation, a Dutch non-profit organization that participates yearly in the Venice Biennale with a large-scale collateral exhibit. They wanted us to participate in “Personal Structures: No Borders”, their Venice Biennale 2017 international exhibit of art by emerging and established artists from all over the world.

As you can imagine, we were very excited about the prospect of bringing our nomadic art gallery to Venice.  But the logistics were daunting: we had to come up with a solid concept and  significant funding within a seemingly impossible timeframe. Never the less, we decided to make the leap and seize the opportunity. We selected an artist whom we thought would make a bold statement: someone highly talented, contemporary, whose creative voice would propose a fresh perspective on Armenian contemporary art.

Continue reading

Down_shift: sight, consciousness and time

HAYP 9.0: Down_shift

A Collective Exhibition

See our “call to artists” here

April 7-16, 2017 

Slowdown. Look. Listen. Observe. In HAYP 9.0: Down_shift, we’re asking artists (and our audience) to slowdown their pace of life, disrupt their routine, and consider unproductive time, or rather, productive delay. We’re talking about tuning in to our perceptive awareness and noticing the little things of the everyday: the sounds, sights, smells, and textures that frame our lives. In other words, deceleration for heightened awareness.

Continue reading

CALL TO PERFORMERS/Կոչ մասնակիցներին

հայերենի տեքստը ստորև ն է գտնվում

Dear artists, storytellers, musicians and performers,

HAYP Pop Up Gallery will be back in Gyumri this fall, from November 18 to 28. Our project “New Illuminations” has three different components: interviews (on-going), a workshop (nov 5-8), and an exhibition (nov 18-28).

We are a pop-up gallery, which means the gallery space will only be open for 10 days (after that, we will be gone… until our next project). We believe that performance art allows people to engage with the visual arts in new and exciting ways. That’s why we want to host events during the exhibit, and we want you to be involved!

If you have a cool concept, it’s your turn to shine!

Continue reading

What’s hayp-ening in Gyumri?

by Charlotte Poulain



Last weekend, the HAYP team traveled to Gyumri – Armenia’s second largest city, described by many as the country’s historical cultural capital.

gyumri-street

Photocredits: Armania.co

In the last few years, Gyumri has seen a lot of movement. The Gyumri Technology center, or “Techno park”, opened its doors in 2014, and more recently, the Friends of Gyumri foundation, Gyumri Project Hope, and dozens of international conferences and events have taken root. You may remember last year’s Luys i Luso installation in October 2015, or this year’s workshop by John Stanmeyer of National Geographic. This summer a documentary screenwriting residency brought together Armenian, Georgian and Turkish screenwriters and directors to promote regional exchange. Slowly but surely, things are starting to bubble.

john_in_armenia

Photo credits: Johninarmenia.blogspot.am

Anna, for one, is convinced that Gyumri has the potential to become “the next Tbilisi” (understand: a hotspot for European travelers, architecture lovers, and party enthusiasts). But until it achieves this kind of international visibility, Gyumri remains a core national artistic hub, and that’s the reason why we’re so drawn to it.

We went there on Saturday to partake in one of our favourite activities: location scouting. Finding a good location is one of the key success factors for any pop up gallery, and it comes with its own set of rules: we need a space that’s empty, full of character, in line with the exhibit’s theme, equipped with amenities such as heating and running water (a bathroom is always a plus), and that’s not too far from the city center….

dsc_0105_rev01

dsc_0047_rev01

Photo credits: Zohrab Bauer

This time, we were scouting for HAYP’s next adventure, a three-fold project that includes interviews, a workshop (New Illuminations from November 4-8) and an exhibit (HAYP 8.0: Codex, opening November 18). We’d heard about a potential match through the grapevine (fact: the Armenian grapevine is actually the most efficient networking system in the world #bambasel #բամբասել)…

We don’t want to disclose too much for now, but let us say this: we’re impressed. Very impressed.

14691092_1198672266884478_7828881611591986460_n

The one and only …original HAYP team

But HAYP prep-work is not only about taking Instagram pictures in beautiful, dusty houses (although if you’re into that… you should definitely follow us on Instagram). This weekend, we also reconnected with Susanna from KASA foundation (where we gave a talk back in February) and discussed potential collaboration for this upcoming project.

img_6676

Charlotte & Susanna

We also had the chance to catch up with Michel Davoudian, CEO of APAGA Technologies. If the name sounds familiar to you, that’s because APAGA sponsored HAYP4.0: IN MOTION – when we took over the Yerevan-Gyumri train with art and performance for 4 days.

Last but not least, on Sunday, after hearing about it for months, we finally got to check out Rob’s Home, a new artsy bar that we quickly dubbed the “Calumet of Gyumri”.

img_6713

We’ll go back there very soon, and in the meantime, expect to hear from us! We’ll soon publish a call to events and performers for our HAYP 8.0 Event Week, from November 18 to 28.

 

HAYP takes a trip to the USA…

You may have been wondering what the HAYP Pop Up Gallery team has been up to since our last event in September, “LOVE (ICA) Is electrIC Again”. For the past two weeks HAYP curator and executive director, Anna Gargarian, traveled stateside for work (and a little bit of play) to Boston and New York. Here’s an update by Anna as she reflects on the highlights from her trip: 

New York, New York

new-york

My time in New York was brief but intense. Although neighborhoods and loci of activity shift, the beauty and awesomeness of the city never change. What stood out from my trip were two very different, but equally interesting museums: The Cooper Hewitt Museum, and the Museum of Art and Design (MAD). 

cooper_hewitt2

The Cooper Hewitt re-opened its doors in 2014 at its 5th avenue location, the 64-roomed Andrew Carnegie Mansion; its home ever since 1976. The museum’s historic architecture offers a stark contrast to the touch-screen tables, large-scale projections, and personal design “pens” that allow visitors to engage with historic and contemporary design objects in a unique and interactive museum experience.

 

Tapping the back of your individual “touch pen” to the description of an object allows you to “save” the object to your personally curated collection of online images. The tip of the pen allows you to draw, select, and play on the tables located at the center of the mansion’s main atrium and corridors. Visitors are invited to make and save their own designs inspired by various objects from the collection. 

ch_interior3

 

The MAD museum was originally founded in 1956 under the name the Museum of Contemporary Crafts. In 2008, the museum reopened under its more catchy name, MAD (the Museum of Art and Design) to embody a broader spectrum of interests that include design, crafts, and artisanal practice, but also architecture, fashion, technology, interior design, and the performing arts. Personally, what stood out was the museum’s display of traditional, artisanal “crafts” (something you’d imagine your grandmother making) in a bold, fresh, and contemporary way. Also unique to this museum is that it not only exhibits works, but also gives you insight into the process of craft making with its open studio artist residencies. 

I loved the exhibit “Toxic Seas” by artists, Margaret and Christine Wertheim and the Institute For Figuring. The exhibit featured large-scale crocheted coral reefs that often incoorporated bits of plastic and reusable materials as a commentary on the pollution we produce and its effects on the marine environment.

coral2coral1

Also noteworthy, the individual pieces were collectively crocheted by women from all over the world who contributed sections of the work. The feminist undertones of elevating what is traditionally “women’s work” to the museum gallery is an added plus. Each artwork wall label included the names of each contributor and her country of origin. This reminded me of our own feminist, “Craftivist” group in Armenia, “Free the Needle”. Maybe they should get involved? Just a thought…

coral3coral4

Another surprising exhibit was artist, Chris Antemann’s, “Forbidden Fruit”, a collection of risqué ceramic figurines inspired by 18th century ceramic decorative arts. Although I’m not usually partial to the ceramic arts, Antemann’s keen sense of humour, brilliant use of form and color, and her masterful use of a “high society” decorative objects to show “debased” and provocative subject matter were completely engaging and charming. I will think twice before judging ceramic figurines in the future…

mad_ceramicmad_ceramic2

Of course, New York City wouldn’t be complete without some late night adventures with old friends….. so this happened in an abandoned factory somewhere in Brooklyn: 

newyork2

Back in the more green lands of Great Barrington, Massachusetts:

gb1

While in my home state of Massachusetts, I travelled westward to Great Barrington (about 2 hours west from Boston) to meet Suzi Banks Baum, the artist I had been Skyping/emailing/facebook messaging for the past three months in order to design and coordinate the upcoming HAYP project, “New Illuminations”. I’ve mentioned Suzi and our project before, but I hadn’t actually physically met her until last week! And what a pleasure…

Suzi is a book artist among many other things. That is, she makes handmade artist books and has been teaching book binding techniques (including coptic stitch binding which she’ll teach at our workshop this November) for many years. For Suzi, handmade books are a unique tool and means of expression for writing, illustrating, and most of all story telling. We are in the process of fundraising for our 4-day workshop and 10-day exhibition in Gyumri this November (donate here!). And another bonus of this visit, I got to reconnect with Dana Walrath, the artist I worked with to curate “Mapping Identity: Figures, Borders, and Nations” for AGBU Exhibitions in Yerevan.

Celebrating 25 years of AIWA

14468770_1117055061694222_1812946297657949764_o

Arts & Entertainment Panel: Sona Movsesian (Conan O’Brien Presents), Anush Yemenidjian (Hollywood Reporter), Teni Melidonian (The Academy), and Nora Armani (SR Film Festival). Photocredits: AIWA.

Next in Massachusetts was my attendance and participation at the AIWA 25th anniversary conference, a truly amazing three-day event of inspiring talks, presentations, and conversations with women leaders from the US, Armenia, Turkey, Argentina, Lebanon and more. We even had a few celebrity speakers (always fun)!

Panel discussions were divided by category including: Global Leadership and Women, Arts and Entertainment, Entrepreneurship and Business, and Leaders in Politics. Keynote speakers included Linda Hill from the Harvard Business School (one of my favorites), Seline Dogan from the Turkish Parliament, Maro Martirosian of Armenia’s Women’s Resource Center, and Katherine Sarafian, longtime producer at Pixar Animation Studios. 

Re-occuring themes in the talks were: implicit bias and gendered perspectives, approaches to leadership, how to “break the silence” and empower women leaders, and various tools for leveraging one’s skills and how to be an effective leader. 

 

panel2

My panel! Photocredits: Juliana Del Aguila

The speakers were many, and inspiring, and HAYP Pop Up Gallery was thrilled and honored to be a part of the conversation as a member of the “Business and Entrepreneurship” panel. Co-panelists included Hasmik Asatrian-Azoyan of Basen hotels in Sisian, Juliana Del Aguila of Karas Wines, and Vera Manoukian of Starwood Hotels. Our dynamic panel addressed questions like: 1) What are your biggest challenges, and how have you overcome them?, 2) What specificities are unique to your industry? etc.

The AIWA conference ended with a deluxe Gala, complete with awards, inspiring speeches, good food, and dancing. Below is a (blurry) picture from the evening.

gala2

Artist Studio Visit:

And of course my trip to the states wouldn’t have been complete without a visit to an artist studio…. introducing: Marsha Nouritza Odabashian.

Marsha is among the many artists who inhabit Boston’s South End artist district. The space itself was invigorating: a large open studio on the fifth floor of a typical Boston “brown stone” building. Her studio mates include an Italian painter, and an American costume designer and tutu-maker.

Marsha works in oil paint, ceramics, acrylic, and other experimental media and uses just as wide a variety of surfaces for her works, including all types of paper, sponge, canvas, wood and more. Her work explores identity and shows reoccurring motifs of flora and fauna (based on reality but often times distorted into fantastical elements), figural processions, and sewing needles (a commentary on woman’s work that underlies the tool’s dual function as weapon). 

studio3studio5studio4

If you haven’t already noticed, Marsha’s body of work is highly inspired by Armenian manuscripts….so of course a bell went off in my head for HAYP8.0’s “New Illuminations- Codex”. Let me just say that my suitcase back to Yerevan was slightly heavier than when I left…. (hint, hint).

What next?

49ffecf9-0ba1-40b0-9353-dd505cf49ac3

Coming up in Great Barrington, Massachusetts is our fundraising event for “New Illuminations”, hosted and organized by artist, Suzi Baum. The fundraiser will be on October 25, 2016 at the Elixir in Great Barrington. Come and join Suzi with an open heart (and an even more open wallet) to learn more about the New Illuminations project.

Meanwhile, in Yerevan the HAYP team will be moving forward full-throtle to find an exhibition space and key partnerships with experts and collaborators in Yerevan and in Gyumri. More coming soon!

Keep checking out the hype with HAYP Pop Up for news on this and many more projects.

Introducing: The New Illuminations

Check out more information about our upcoming project, HAYP8.0 NEW ILLUMINATIONS

New Illuminations

by Anna Gargarian, HAYP Pop Up Gallery


The idea for “New Illuminations” took root in the creative mind of artist, Suzi Banks Baum back in March of 2016 during her first visit to Armenia. Suzi was among a group of photojournalists who were invited by National Geographic photographer, John Stanmeyer, as well as Anush Babajanyan and Nazik Armenakyan of 4Plus Photography, to come to Armenia for several weeks with a storyline.  

12829256_10208958504859511_7202841814466965724_oSuzi Baum (top right) with the team of photojournalists including John Stanmeyer (back row center) in Armenia in March, 2016. Photocredits: 4Plus Photography.

Suzi’s storyline: what are the realities faced by women artists in Gyumri, Armenia? What are the thresholds and challenges they encounter in their creative practice? 

12814434_10208933297749349_1750150045420713735_nSuzi Baum with several of the women artists she interviewed in Gyumri, Armenia. March, 2016. Photocredits: Suzi Baum.

Her trip to the Matenadaran, Armenia’s manuscript museum, left her awestruck and…

View original post 775 more words

Aaaaand we’re back

by Charlotte Poulain


As you may have noticed, HAYP hasn’t been popping up all that often in 2016. Our first project this year (and biggest to date) was Lips of Pride, a collective exhibit focused on women’s sexuality and societal perceptions of shame in Armenia. We haven’t been idle since: we organized an aerial dancing performance by Marcela Perez at 44 SkyBar in June, as well as a full day workshop with HARTAK festival on how to test your business idea with a pop up.

AERIAL_DANCEWORKSHOP_hartak

At the same time, we’ve been working on several projects that will come to life this fall and next spring. Anna’s also been invited to talk about art and entrepreneurship at AIWA’s 25th anniversary conference in Boston this September (‘cause she’s fabulous). Bostonians may even expect to see a pop up in their neighborhood for the occasion (more details coming soon).

…And now the awesome news is: HAYP Pop Up Gallery is back this summer with a major event this Friday! (Facebook event here)

This time around, we’re working in collaboration with the Institute for Contemporary Art (ICA). For those of you who don’t know it yet, the ICA is a Yerevan-based institution that offers art classes, hosts artists in residence, and curates exhibitions. Their venue on Fizkulturnikner street recently underwent renovation, so their Director and Curator Nazareth Karoyan decided a mural was in order, and they commissioned Yerevan-born artist Samvel Saghatelian for the job.

Back in November, we had worked with Samvel to curate a solo exhibit in the secret back room of a vape shop called Misty Fumes. The exhibition was titled “Enter Through the Smoke Shop” and presented Samvel’s “PolitIcal and Personal Protest signs”, a series of graphic sign boards playing with Latin and Armenian letters. Perhaps the most iconic of these works was “LOVE is electric Է”, created by the artist in June 2015 at the time of the Electric Yerevan protest.

MISTY_FUMES_EXPO

The mural at the ICA is a scaled-up elaboration on that work. Just as this year’s protests have grown in intensity, Samvel Saghatelian’s demand for love has multiplied in scale from hand-held sign board to the entire building facade. Because it deserves to be inaugurated in style, HAYP Pop Up Gallery and the ICA have joined forces to curate the second edition of Samvel Saghatelian’s “Political and Personal Protest Signs”. If you didn’t get to see his works in November for HAYP 5.0, now’s your chance!

Join us for LOVE ICA – is electrIC Again”, the mural’s public inauguration and a HAYP exhibition opening on Friday, August 26 at 7PM, at the ICA (Facebook event here). Wine and music can be enjoyed in the ICA’s garden, and in front of Samvel’s larger than life artwork. Don’t miss out!

SER_IS_ELECTRIC

LOCATION:
48 Fizkulturnikner Street (at the end of 5th st in Aygestan district of Yerevan behind Alek Manukyan st).

ica_evn